U.S. Hiring to Stay on a Steady Course, According to CareerBuilder’s Q2 Job Forecast Hiring In Manufacturing is Expected to Outpace the National Average

U.S. Hiring to Stay on a Steady Course, According to CareerBuilder’s Q2 Job Forecast
Hiring In Manufacturing is Expected to Outpace the National Average

CHICAGO – April 3, 2014 – The U.S. jobs outlook for the second quarter is akin to last year’s forecast, but certain industries are expected to outperform the national average for hiring. The number of manufacturing employers planning to add full-time, permanent headcount increased three percentage points over Q2 2013 and beat the national average for this year’s forecast by seven percentage points. Information Technology, Financial Services, Professional and Business Services and Health Care are also among industries projected to lead in job creation.

View full report: http://www.careerbuildercommunications.com/pdf/careerbuilder_q22014_forecast.pdf

“While employment has not yet reached an ideal level, the U.S. is moving closer to the tipping point for substantial job growth,” said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder and co-author of The Talent Equation. “The economy is expanding, the housing market is recovering, consumer confidence is up and companies are starting to tap into cash reserves to invest – these are all good signs. As these trends strengthen, we expect hiring to hold steady in the second quarter and gain ground in the back half of the year.”

The national survey was conducted online by Harris Poll on behalf of CareerBuilder from February 10 to March 4, 2014, and included a representative sample of 2,138 hiring managers and human resource professionals across industries and company sizes.

Hiring in Q1 2014

In a previous survey completed in December 2013, 27 percent of employers planned to hire full-time, permanent employees in the first quarter of 2014. The number of employers who actually hired full-time, permanent staff was 29 percent, up from 28 percent in the same period last year.

Eleven percent decreased headcount, down from 12 percent last year. Fifty-nine percent said there was no change in their number of full-time, permanent employees while 2 percent were unsure.

Hiring in Q2 2014

Looking ahead, 26 percent of employers plan to add full-time, permanent staff in the second quarter, on par with last year. Given that employers historically have been more conservative in estimates than actual hiring activity, the number may come in higher at quarter’s end.

Eight percent of employers expect to downsize staff, down from 9 percent last year. Sixty-one percent anticipate no change while 5 percent are undecided.

The top five industries that are expected to surpass the national average for adding full-time, permanent staff in the second quarter include:

· Information Technology – 34 percent of hiring managers

· Financial Services – 34 percent

· Manufacturing – 33 percent

· Health Care1 – 28 percent

· Professional and Business Services – 28 percent

Temporary Hiring

Temporary employment is showing a slight improvement over last year’s projections. Thirty-three percent of employers plan to hire temporary or contract workers in the second quarter, up from 32 percent in 2013. Twenty-six percent are planning to transition some contract or temporary staff into permanent employees in the second quarter, up from 24 percent last year.

Hiring By Company Size

Hiring among small businesses is also expected to grow marginally compared to the second quarter last year:

· 50 or fewer employees – 18 percent plan to add full-time, permanent staff in Q2, up from 17 percent last year; those reducing headcount stayed at 6 percent

· 250 or fewer employees – 22 percent plan to add full-time, permanent staff in Q2, up from 21 percent last year; those reducing headcount decreased from 7 percent last year to 6 percent

· 500 or fewer employees – 23 percent plan to add full-time, permanent staff in Q2, up from 22 percent last year; those reducing headcount decreased from 8 percent last year to 6 percent

· More than 500 employees – 32 percent plan to add full-time, permanent staff in Q2, down from 33 percent last year; those reducing headcount increased from 10 percent last year to 11 percent

Compensation

Thirty-one percent of employers anticipate no change in salary levels in the second quarter compared to the same period last year. Forty-one percent expect there will be an increase of 3 percent or less. Nineteen percent expect their average changes will be between 4 and 10 percent and 2 percent predict an increase of 11 percent or more. Three percent anticipate a decline in salaries and 5 percent are undecided.

1 Health Care organizations with 50 or more employees

Survey Methodology

This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Poll on behalf of CareerBuilder among 2,138 hiring managers and human resource professionals ages 18 and over (employed full-time, not self-employed, non-government) between February 10 and March 4, 2014 (percentages for some questions are based on a subset, based on their responses to certain questions). With a pure probability sample of 2,138, one could say with a 95 percent probability that the overall results have a sampling error of +/- 2.12 percentage points. Sampling error for data from sub-samples is higher and varies.

About CareerBuilder®

CareerBuilder is the global leader in human capital solutions, helping companies target and attract great talent. Its online career site, CareerBuilder.com®, is the largest in the United States with more than 24 million unique visitors and 1 million jobs. CareerBuilder works with the world’s top employers, providing everything from labor market intelligence to talent management software and other recruitment solutions. Owned by Gannett Co., Inc. (NYSE:GCI), Tribune Company and The McClatchy Company (NYSE:MNI), CareerBuilder and its subsidiaries operate in the United States, Europe, South America, Canada and Asia. For more information, visit http://www.careerbuilder.com.

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Cautious Hiring to Continue in the New Year, According to CareerBuilder’s Annual Job Forecast

Cautious Hiring to Continue in the New Year, According to CareerBuilder’s Annual Job Forecast
• More jobs coming back to U.S. shores • Part-time and temporary hiring to increase • U.S. debt negotiations and the Affordable Care Act factor into hiring activity

CHICAGO – December 31, 2013 – Caution remains a staple in recruitment plans. CareerBuilder’s annual forecast shows that debt issues in Washington may continue to play a part in impeding a more accelerated jobs recovery. Twenty-four percent of companies reported that they will add full-time, permanent employees in 2014, down two percentage points from 2013. Nearly one in four employers (23 percent) said they will hire at a slower rate or will not expand headcount at all until the debt ceiling is resolved in the first quarter.

View full report here: http://careerbuildercommunications.com/pdf/careerbuilder2014_forecast.pdf

“The general sentiment shared by employers whom CareerBuilder talks to every day is that there will be a better job market in 2014,” said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder and co-author of The Talent Equation. “What we saw in our survey was reluctance from some employers to commit to adding jobs until the outcomes of debt negotiations and other issues affecting economic expansion are clearer. As these stories play out and employers find their footing in the New Year, there is greater potential for the average monthly job creation in 2014 to exceed that of 2013.”

The national survey was conducted online by Harris Interactive© from November 6 to December 2, 2013, and included a representative sample of 2,201 hiring managers and human resource professionals across industries and company sizes.

Full-time, Permanent Hiring

While 24 percent of employers expect to hire full-time, permanent staff – down from 26 percent last year – one in ten are still undecided about their recruitment plans. Thirteen percent plan to decrease staff levels – up from 9 percent last year – while 54 percent anticipate no change.

Where Are They Hiring?

Hiring for STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) occupations is expected to take center stage with more than one in four employers (26 percent) planning to create jobs in these areas over the next 12 months.

Looking at functions across an organization, the top two positions companies plan to hire for in the New Year – Sales and Information Technology – are also where employers expect to provide the biggest salary increases.

Hiring managers plan to recruit full-time, permanent employees for:

Sales – 30 percent
Information Technology – 29 percent
Customer Service – 25 percent
Production – 24 percent
Administrative – 22 percent
Engineering – 17 percent
Marketing – 17 percent
Business Development – 17 percent
Accounting/Finance – 15 percent
Research/Development – 13 percent
Human Resources – 10 percent

Temporary and Contract Hiring

Temporary workers are accounting for a larger share of the employee base within organizations. Forty-two percent of employers plan to hire temporary or contract workers in 2014, up from 40 percent last year. Of these employers, 43 percent plan to transition some temporary employees into full-time, permanent members of their staff.

Five Trends to Watch in the New Year

1) Part-time hiring on the rise – Seventeen percent of employers expect to recruit part-time workers over the next 12 months, up three percentage points over last year. While various factors will influence this trend, 12 percent of all employers stated that they will likely hire more part-time workers in 2014 due to the Affordable Care Act.

2) More companies “onshoring” jobs – One of the most popular imports of the New Year just may be previously lost jobs. Twenty-three percent of companieswho offshore jobs said they brought some of those jobs back to the U.S. in 2013; 26 percent plan to do so in 2014.

3) Skills gap widening – Looking at a subset of human resource managers, half (51 percent) said they currently have positions for which they can’t find qualified candidates. Forty-six percent said these positions go unfilled for three months or longer.

4) Companies building the perfect employee instead of waiting for one – In light of the skills gap, nearly half (49 percent) of employers plan to train people who don’t have experience in their industry or field and hire them in 2014, up 10 percentage points over last year. Twenty-six percent of employers are sending current employees back to school to get an advanced degree – and picking up all or part of the cost.

5) Companies looking for recruits in high schools – More companies are connecting with future generations of workers to establish a constant pipeline of job candidates.Twenty-seven percent of hiring managers have promoted careers at their firms to high school students or, in some cases, even younger; 25 percent plan to do so in 2014.

Small Business Hiring

Nearly two in five (39 percent) small businesses with 250 or fewer employees reported that they are still struggling to recover from the last recession. Like their larger counterparts, small businesses are also staying cautious as they assess market potential in the year ahead.

50 or fewer employees – 19 percent plan to add full-time, permanent staff in 2014, the same as last year; 9 percent plan to reduce headcount, up from 6 percent last year.
250 or fewer employees – 22 percent plan to add full-time, permanent staff in 2014, down from 24 percent in 2013; 9 percent plan to reduce headcount, up from 7 percent last year.
500 or fewer employees – 23 percent plan to add full-time, permanent staff in 2014, down from 24 percent in 2013; 10 percent plan to reduce headcount, up from 7 percent last year.

Hiring By Region

While the West continues to lead the other regions in hiring plans, the Northeast was the only region that saw a year-over-year increase in the number of employers expecting to add full-time, permanent staff. The South reported the biggest year-over-year decline (5 percentage points) in employers adding full-time, permanent headcount, while the Midwest has the largest number of employers expecting to downsize staffs.

West – 26 percent plan to add full-time, permanent staff in 2014, down from 28 percent in 2013; 11 percent plan to reduce headcount, up from 9 percent last year.
Northeast – 24 percent plan to add full-time, permanent staff in 2014, up slightly from 23 percent in 2013; 13 percent plan to reduce headcount, up from 10 percent last year.
Midwest – 24 percent plan to add full-time, permanent staff in 2014, on par with 2013; 15 percent plan to reduce headcount, up from 10 percent last year.
South – 22 percent plan to add full-time, permanent staff in 2014, down from 27 percent in 2013; 12 percent plan to reduce headcount, up from 9 percent last year.

Compensation in 2014

Compensation is becoming more competitive for specialized labor with 26 percent of employers planning to raise starting salaries for high-skill roles in 2014.

Looking across positions within an organization, 73 percent of employers plan to increase compensation for existing employees – on par with last year – while 49 percent will offer higher starting salaries for new employees – up from 47 percent last year. Most increases will be 3 percent or less.

Survey Methodology

This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Interactive© on behalf of CareerBuilder among 2,201 hiring managers and human resource professionals (employed full-time, not self-employed, non-government) between November 6 and December 2, 2013 (percentages for some questions are based on a subset, based on their responses to certain questions). With a pure probability sample of 2,201, one could say with a 95 percent probability that the overall results have a sampling error of +/- 2.09 percentage points. Sampling error for data from sub-samples is higher and varies.

About CareerBuilder®

CareerBuilder is the global leader in human capital solutions, helping companies target and attract great talent. Its online career site, CareerBuilder.com®, is the largest in the United States with more than 24 million unique visitors and 1 million jobs. CareerBuilder works with the world’s top employers, providing everything from labor market intelligence to talent management software and other recruitment solutions. Owned by Gannett Co., Inc. (NYSE:GCI), Tribune Company and The McClatchy Company (NYSE:MNI), CareerBuilder and its subsidiaries operate in the United States, Europe, South America, Canada and Asia. For more information, visit http://www.careerbuilder.com.

The Top Staffing Challenges for IT Employers in 2014

CHICAGO – March 18, 2014 – The recession officially ended nearly five years ago, but many IT employers aren’t seeing the benefits of the recovery. Forty-nine percent of hiring managers and human resource professionals at information technology companies say, from their company’s perspective, it doesn’t feel like the recession ever ended, according to a new survey from CareerBuilder and Sologig.com – its job site for technology professionals. A third (32 percent) said their company is struggling to recover from the recession and 34 percent say their staff is still smaller than before the recession.

The national survey was conducted online by Harris Poll on behalf of CareerBuilder from November 6 to December 2, 2013, and included a representative sample of 161 IT hiring managers and human resource professionals across company sizes.

“Despite the emergence of successful tech startups and exponential growth of several computer science and engineering occupations, many IT employers are confronted by a variety of staffing challenges that have the potential to limit productivity and innovation,” said Eric Presley, chief technology officer at CareerBuilder. “The top issues in 2014 will be the retention and recruitment of high-skill talent. The most-in demand workers are attracting lucrative offers nationwide, meaning employers have to recognize and incentivize their best talent to stay ahead of the competition.”

The following are the top 15 staffing challenges faced by IT hiring managers:

1. Retaining top talent – 36 percent

2. Lifting employee morale – 31 percent

3. Recruiting high skill applicants – 29 percent

4. Providing competitive compensation – 27 percent

5. Worker burnout – 26 percent

6. Maintaining productivity levels – 25 percent

7. Managing organizational changes – 21 percent

8. Providing competitive benefits – 20 percent

9. Providing upward mobility – 17 percent

10. Cutting down on cost-per-hire – 16 percent

11. Providing enough training opportunities to employees – 16 percent

12. Finding time to sort through applications and interview applicants – 13 percent

13. Employee engagement – 12 percent

14. Cutting down on time to hire – 11 percent

15. Adapting to new ways or sourcing/recruiting candidates – 11 percent

Survey Methodology
This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Poll on behalf of CareerBuilder among 161 IT hiring managers and human resource professionals ages 18 and over (employed full-time, not self-employed, non-government) between November 6 and December 2, 2013 (percentages for some questions are based on a subset, based on their responses to certain questions). With a pure probability sample of 161, one could say with a 95 percent probability that the overall results have a sampling error of +/-7.72 percentage points. Sampling error for data from sub-samples is higher and varies.

About Sologig.com and CareerBuilder®

Sologig is an employment website that connects experienced IT and engineering professionals and matches them with relevant opportunities. Users can also post resumes, sign up for automatic job alerts, and take advantage of job search management tools.

CareerBuilder is the global leader in human capital solutions, helping companies target and attract great talent. Its online career site, CareerBuilder.com®, is the largest in the United States with more than 24 million unique visitors and 1 million jobs. CareerBuilder works with the world’s top employers, providing everything from labor market intelligence to talent management software and other recruitment solutions. Owned by Gannett Co., Inc. (NYSE:GCI), Tribune Company and The McClatchy Company (NYSE:MNI), CareerBuilder and its subsidiaries operate in the United States, Europe, South America, Canada and Asia. For more information, visit http://www.careerbuilder.com.

CareerBuilder Survey Finds Majority of Workers Feel They Are Overweight Survey Reveals Who is Most Likely to Gain Weight on the Job

CareerBuilder Survey Finds Majority of Workers Feel They Are Overweight
Survey Reveals Who is Most Likely to Gain Weight on the Job

CHICAGO – April 17, 2014 – As the polar vortex finally releases its grip on the U.S. and beach season is no longer a mirage, workers are examining their physical fitness with mixed results. More than half of workers (55 percent) categorize themselves as overweight, on par with last year. Thirty-nine percent say they’ve gained weight at their current job, with 21 percent putting on more than 10 pounds and 9 percent putting on more than 20 pounds. Sixteen percent report they have actually lost weight at their job, while 45 percent say their weight stayed the same.

The study shows that physical fitness may have some influence on how people are treated at the office. Nearly one in five workers (18 percent) feel that people who are thin and fit are shown more favoritism in their workplace.

The national survey was conducted online by Harris Poll on behalf of CareerBuilder from February 10 to March 4, 2014, and included a representative sample of 3,022 full-time, private sector workers across industries and company sizes.

So, who is most likely to gain weight at work?

Management

That corner office may come with some drawbacks. Forty-four percent of people in management roles have gained weight in their current job, compared to 38 percent of people in non-management roles.

Workers Ages 35 and Up

Seasoned workers are more likely to report tipping the scales in their current position, with 40 percent of workers ages 35 and older gaining weight, compared to 36 percent of those under 35 years of age. Eighteen to 24 year olds were the least likely, with 30 percent saying they put on extra pounds.

Women

Forty-six percent of female workers say they’ve gained weight on the job, compared to 33 percent of their male counterparts. Men are also more likely to exercise on a consistent basis, with 59 percent regularly going to the gym compared to 56 percent of women.

IT Professionals

Some industries are more prone to weight gain, with Information Technology and Government leading the pack. Industries that outpaced the national average for weight gain include:

· Information Technology – 50 percent

· Government – 48 percent*

· Financial Services – 46 percent

· Health Care – 42 percent

· Professional and Business Services – 42 percent

Workers in the West

Workers in the West were the most likely to pack on pounds, with 44 percent saying they’ve put on weight at their current job. They are followed by the Northeast (40 percent), the South (37 percent) and the Midwest (37 percent).

Tips for Staying Fit at Work

For those looking to shed some pounds this summer, CareerBuilder experts offered the following suggestions:

· Avoid Too Many Treats: Twenty-one percent of workers who have gained weight on the job blame part of it on coworkers who bring treats into the office. Don’t be afraid to politely decline when someone is passing around sweets. It’s good practice to have a set of personal rules regarding treats in the office, such as a per-week limit or an “only Friday” policy.

· Make Exercise a Part of Your Routine: Forty-two percent of workers don’t exercise regularly, with 13 percent not exercising at all. Try sneaking a workout into your daily routine by getting off the bus or subway a stop early, working at a standing desk or taking the stairs instead of the elevator.

· Get Up: It’s all too common in the modern office setting for people to send an email or instant message rather than get up and walk across the room. When you have the opportunity to stretch out your legs, take it!

· Pack a Lunch: Twenty-eight percent of employees who gained weight in their current job say that one of the main culprits is regularly eating out. Packing your own lunch the night before allows you to take better control of your portion sizes, not to mention it helps you avoid impulse decisions that often lead to less-healthy fast food.

· Look Into Perks and Benefits: More than 1 in 4 workers (28 percent) say their companies provide gym memberships or other wellness benefits, but nearly one in ten workers (9 percent) say they don’t know whether their company offers such perks. Check with your human resources department to make sure you’re taking full advantage of what’s offered.

* CareerBuilder commissioned study, conducted online by Harris Poll 2014 Job Forecast, February-March 2014

Survey Methodology

This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Poll on behalf of CareerBuilder among 3,022 workers ages 18 and over (employed full-time, not self-employed, non-government) between February 10 and March 4, 2014 (percentages for some questions are based on a subset, based on their responses to certain questions). With a pure probability sample of 3,022, one could say with a 95 percent probability that the overall results have a sampling error of +/- 1.78 percentage points. Sampling error for data from sub-samples is higher and varies.

About CareerBuilder®

CareerBuilder is the global leader in human capital solutions, helping companies target and attract great talent. Its online career site, CareerBuilder.com®, is the largest in the United States with more than 24 million unique visitors and 1 million jobs. CareerBuilder works with the world’s top employers, providing everything from labor market intelligence to talent management software and other recruitment solutions. Owned by Gannett Co., Inc. (NYSE:GCI), Tribune Company and The McClatchy Company (NYSE:MNI), CareerBuilder and its subsidiaries operate in the United States, Europe, South America, Canada and Asia. For more information, visit http://www.careerbuilder.com.

IT Firms Cite Many Reasons for Hiring Difficulties, finds New Sologig.com Survey

CHICAGO – April 23, 2014 – Most IT companies are struggling to fill certain positions, but the reasons behind their recruiting challenges are nuanced, according to a new survey by Sologig.com – CareerBuilder’s job site for computer and IT professionals. The nationwide survey was conducted by Harris Poll on behalf of Sologig between October 17, 2013 and November 6, 2013, among 240 hiring and human resources managers in the information technology industry.

Fifty-three percent of information technology firms have open positions for which they can’t find qualified candidates. But among those concerned about a skills gap, several causes are seen as driving factors.

What is causing the skills gap?

· Gaps in expectations around wages: 40 percent

· New and shifting technologies: 39 percent

· Job requirements that are above entry-level: 38 percent

· Education gaps in particular areas: 33 percent

· Gaps in on the job training: 33 percent

· Job requirements that are too specific: 29 percent

· Outsourcing of jobs to other countries: 26 percent

“At the pace certain programming and development skills evolve, there’s no silver bullet for recruiting tough-to-fill technology jobs,” said Eric Presley, chief technology officer for CareerBuilder. “Employers have to constantly evaluate their talent needs through workforce planning and ensure their compensation is competitive enough to attract top talent. IT workers, meanwhile, must always be polishing their existing competencies and acquiring new ones to stay relevant.”

Experience and Training

Forty-five percent of IT hiring managers believe training should be equally shared between employers and workers and 29 percent say the bulk of the responsibility should fall on the employer. Forty-four percent of IT employers provide technical skills training on-the-job.

However, 60 percent of IT hiring managers have never hired someone who doesn’t meet the full requirements of the job listing.

Is Compensation Competitive?

Boosting compensation is often the simplest way to enhance a pool of skilled candidates. Currently, only 20 percent of IT employers think their organizations offer “extremely or very” competitive pay. Forty-four percent said they would consider increasing compensation for tough-to-fill roles and 22 percent said they would not. Thirty-four percent said they’ve already increased compensation.

Additionally, 34 percent feel they can pay employees less due to the high-unemployment rate – a view that could actually deter truly in-demand workers from accepting roles.

Survey Methodology

This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Poll on behalf of CareerBuilder among 240 Information Technology employers (employed full-time, not self-employed and have full or significant involvement in hiring decisions) ages 18 and over between October 17 and November 6, 2013 (percentages for some questions are based on a subset, based on their responses to certain questions). With a pure probability sample of 240, one could say with a 95 percent probability that the overall results have a sampling error of +/-6.33 percentage points. Sampling error for data from sub-samples is higher and varies.

About Sologig.com and CareerBuilder®

Sologig is an employment website that connects experienced IT and engineering professionals and matches them with relevant opportunities. Users can also post resumes, sign up for automatic job alerts, and take advantage of job search management tools.

CareerBuilder is the global leader in human capital solutions, helping companies target and attract great talent. Its online career site, CareerBuilder.com®, is the largest in the United States with more than 24 million unique visitors and 1 million jobs. CareerBuilder works with the world’s top employers, providing everything from labor market intelligence to talent management software and other recruitment solutions. Owned by Gannett Co., Inc. (NYSE:GCI), Tribune Company and The McClatchy Company (NYSE:MNI), CareerBuilder and its subsidiaries operate in the United States, Europe, South America, Canada and Asia. For more information, visit http://www.careerbuilder.com.

New Survey Explores the State of the Nursing Profession

CHICAGO, May 6, 2014 – As nearly 3.5 million nursing professionals are celebrated during National Nurses Week, a new study from CareerBuilder finds that while the profession may be evolving, it remains a rewarding and satisfying career for the vast majority who enter it. Nearly all nursing professionals (93 percent) are satisfied with being a nurse and 85 percent are unlikely to ever switch careers.

But besides their passion for patient care, what do nurses want out of their careers, and how do they view the evolution of technology, policy, and education affecting their day-to-day roles?

The nationwide study – conducted on behalf of CareerBuilder by Harris Poll between March 11 and March 28, 2014 – explores changes to the nursing profession, differences between nursing settings, the value of various training and education programs, and the desired career paths of nursing professionals. Participants included approximately 900 U.S. nurses working full or part-time in hospital, ambulatory, home care, hospice, or long-term care/ skilled nursing settings.

“We’ve long known that the men and women who enter nursing are as essential to their organizations as they are to their patients. So it’s important that as the health care landscape shifts, their voices continue to be recognized by administrators and other industry leaders,” said Jason Lovelace, president of CareerBuilder’s health care division. “One of the biggest challenges for the industry is the need to make room for the tens of thousands of people who enter the profession each year while simultaneously satisfying health care organizations’ need for skilled, veteran nurses. The study made clear that while nurses feel traditional academic settings are working, mentoring and continuing education programs are a vital piece of individual career development and assist nurses’ ability to excel at efficient, compassionate patient care.”

The following are highlights from the study. A full report will be released in early June.

Changes in the Nursing Profession

· While direct patient care takes up 38 percent of a nurses’ time (more than any other function), 41 percent feel they are spending less time on patient care than five years ago / beginning of their career. A majority (52 percent) say there are spending more time on notes and documentation related to patient care than five years ago/ beginning of their career, while a third are spending more time on administrative tasks (33%).

· Fifty-seven percent of nurses think technology-based tools help them do their job more effectively; however, 46 percent think technology has made patient care more de-personalized.

· Nurses are generally not optimistic about how the Affordable Care Act will affect their work. Forty-seven percent feel the reforms will have a negative effect on the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of patient care and 31 percent think it will have a positive effect. Twenty-three percent anticipate the reforms will have no effect.

Nursing Career Paths

· About 4 in 10 nurses (43 percent) plan to stay in their current setting – e.g. hospital or ambulatory – for at least 5 years. Home care and skilled nursing professionals are the most likely to be currently looking for a new setting. Ambulatory nurses are the least likely to look for a new setting.

· Most nurses (54 percent) who want to move to a new area of nursing want to do so for a better work/life balance. Pay is the second leading factor (43 percent).

· Acute care hospitals are seen as the most rewarding nursing setting by 25 percent of nurses. A combination of acute, specialty, and ambulatory follows with 17 percent. Specialty care hospitals are seen as the most rewarding by only 4 percent.

· Many nurses appear content with never stepping into a management role. Thirty-seven percent of nurses have not worked in a management role and have no plans to.

Mentorship and Education

· Nearly-two thirds of nurses (63 percent) had a mentor assigned to help them “learn the ropes” when they began their nursing career. Virtually all (96 percent) who had a mentor said the person was helpful in some way.

· Forty-nine percent said that since they began their career the need for mentoring has increased; only 18 percent said the need has decreased.

· Informal, on-the-job training appears to be just as important as a nursing degree in terms of preparation for clinical demands. Forty-five percent said their degree prepared them very well for the job, while 51 percent said informal training prepared them very well.

· Entry-level education requirements are now tilted toward higher education. Forty-seven percent of nurses said their minimum requirement for beginning a nursing career was a bachelor’s degree or higher. One-half of nurses practicing 15 years or less (51 percent) said a bachelor’s degree or higher was the minimum requirement for beginning their nursing career, compared to 42% of nurses practicing for longer than 15 years.

Survey Methodology

This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Poll on behalf of CareerBuilder among 886 nurses employed full-time or part-time in a hospital, ambulatory, home care, hospice, or long-term care/ skilled nursing settings ages 18 and over between March 11 and March 28, 2014 (percentages for some questions are based on a subset, based on their responses to certain questions). With a pure probability sample of 886, one could say with a 95 percent probability that the overall results have a sampling error of +/- 3.29 percentage points. Sampling error for data from sub-samples is higher and varies.

About CareerBuilder®

CareerBuilder is the global leader in human capital solutions, helping companies target and attract great talent. Its online career site, CareerBuilder.com®, is the largest in the United States with more than 24 million unique visitors and 1 million jobs. CareerBuilder works with the world’s top employers, providing everything from labor market intelligence to talent management software and other recruitment solutions. Owned by Gannett Co., Inc. (NYSE:GCI), Tribune Company and The McClatchy Company (NYSE:MNI), CareerBuilder and its subsidiaries operate in the United States, Europe, South America, Canada and Asia. For more information, visit http://www.careerbuilder.com.

New CareerBuilder Study Explores the Perks and Pitfalls of Working in a Desk Job Vs. a Non-Desk Job

CHICAGO – May 22, 2014 – What are the advantages and disadvantages of working in a desk job vs. a non-desk job? Which workers are happier, are less stressed or earn more? Which are more likely to gain weight? A new nationwide study has the answers. The survey was conducted online by Harris Poll on behalf of CareerBuilder from February 10 to March 4, 2014, and included a representative sample across industries and company sizes of 2,095 people who typically work behind a desk and 1,102 people who don’t typically work behind a desk.

Key Findings

1) Workers in desk jobs and non-desk jobs were equally likely to report being happy in their current roles (76 percent), but workers in desk jobs were more likely to report complaints about their work environment. Many workers in desk jobs said their positions enable them to stay in the loop and build closer relationships with company leaders and peers while workers in non-desk jobs said their positions give them greater variety and flexibility in their work day. Thirty-eight percent of workers in non-desk jobs said they had no complaints about their work environment compared to 14 percent of workers in desk jobs.

2) Workers in desk jobs were more likely to report being overweight. Fifty-eight percent of workers in desk jobs categorize themselves as overweight compared to 51 percent of workers in non-desk jobs. Forty-six percent of workers in desk jobs have gained weight in their current position compared to 30 percent of workers in non-desk jobs.

3) People who work in desk jobs reported earning higher salaries and felt more content with their paychecks. Those working in desk jobs were twice as likely to earn six figures annually, while those working in non-desk jobs were twice as likely to earn less than $35,000. Half of workers in desk jobs earn $50,000 or more compared to one-third of workers in non-desk jobs. Seventy-one percent of workers in desk jobs said that they currently earn or are close to earning their desired salary compared to 61 percent of workers in non-desk jobs.

Earn less than $35,000
Workers in desk jobs – 20 percent
Workers in non-desk jobs – 40 percent

Earn $50,000 or more
Workers in desk jobs – 50 percent
Workers in non-desk jobs – 32 percent

Earn $100,000 or more
Workers in desk jobs – 13 percent
Workers in non-desk jobs – 7 percent

4) Workers in desk jobs and non-desk jobs were equally likely to experience high stress levels at work (30 percent and 29 percent, respectively), but workers in non-desk jobs had a somewhat higher tendency toward burnout. Sixty-one percent of workers in non-desk jobs said they have felt burned out at work compared to 57 percent of workers in desk jobs.

“Everyone has a different definition of the ideal work experience,” said Rosemary Haefner, Vice President of Human Resources at CareerBuilder. “For some, it’s being in the thick of the action in the office. For others, it’s the flexibility of not working behind a desk. There are advantages and disadvantages to both scenarios. With any job, it’s important to find a work environment that is suited to your work style and interests and where you can thrive.”

Advantages and Disadvantages of Working in a Desk Job

When asked to identify some of the perks of their work environment, workers in desk jobs pointed to:

· Access to technology/Internet – 72 percent

· Having a job that is not physically demanding – 60 percent

· Having a routine – 59 percent

· Ability to communicate with company leaders and peers more easily – 33 percent

· Opportunity to build closer relationships with company leaders and peers – 25 percent

· Ability to stay in the loop on new developments in the company – 22 percent

When asked to identify shortcomings of their work environment, workers in desk jobs cited the following:

· Not enough physical activity – 56 percent

· Staring at a computer screen most of the day – 56 percent

· Stuck inside most of the day – 51 percent

· Doing the same work every day, not enough variety – 24 percent

· More distractions/disruptions from co-workers – 23 percent

Advantages and Disadvantages of Working in a Non-Desk Job

When asked to identify some of the perks of their work environment, workers in non-desk jobs pointed to:

· Ability to stay more physically active – 68 percent

· Variety in their workday – 54 percent

· Not being stuck in front of a computer all day – 51 percent

· Having more flexibility – 41 percent

· Not having to get dressed up to go to work – 39 percent

· Not having to deal with office politics – 33 percent

When asked to identify shortcomings of their work environment, workers in non-desk jobs cited the following:

· Exhausted from working on my feet all day – 35 percent

· More prone to injury or illness – 24 percent

· Less recognition for my efforts – 17 percent

· Not as informed about new company developments – 15 percent

· Less chance for upward mobility – 11 percent

· Less face-to-face interaction with leaders and peers – 9 percent

Survey Methodology

This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Poll on behalf of CareerBuilder among 3,197 workers ages 18 and over (employed full-time, not self-employed, non-government) of which 2,095 typically work behind a desk and 1,102 don’t typically work behind a desk between February 10 and March 4, 2014 (percentages for some questions are based on a subset, based on their responses to certain questions). With pure probability samples of 2,095 and 1,102, one could say with a 95 percent probability that the overall results have sampling errors of +/-2.14 and +/-2.95 percentage points, respectively. Sampling error for data from sub-samples is higher and varies.

About CareerBuilder®

CareerBuilder is the global leader in human capital solutions, helping companies target and attract great talent. Its online career site, CareerBuilder.com®, is the largest in the United States with more than 24 million unique visitors and 1 million jobs. CareerBuilder works with the world’s top employers, providing everything from labor market intelligence to talent management software and other recruitment solutions. Owned by Gannett Co., Inc. (NYSE:GCI), Tribune Company and The McClatchy Company (NYSE:MNI), CareerBuilder and its subsidiaries operate in the United States, Europe, South America, Canada and Asia. For more information, visit http://www.careerbuilder.com.

CareerBuilder Study Reveals Top Ten Productivity Killers at Work

Employers Share Most Unusual Things They Caught Employees Doing When They Should Have Been Working

CHICAGO – June 12, 2014 – What causes workers to waste the most time at the office? Texting? Surfing the Web? Chatting with co-workers around the water cooler? New research from CareerBuilder identifies behaviors that employers say are the biggest productivity killers in the workplace. The study also highlights some of the strangest things employers have caught employees doing while on the clock.

View the infographic here: cb.com/SO2IsR

The national survey was conducted online by Harris Poll on behalf of CareerBuilder from February 10 to March 4, 2014, and included a representative sample of 2,138 hiring managers and human resource professionals, and a representative sample of 3,022 full-time, private sector workers across industries and company sizes.

Not surprisingly, personal use of technology is one of the leading culprits behind unproductive activity at work. One in four workers (24 percent) admitted that, during a typical workday, they will spend at least one hour a day on personal calls, emails or texts. Twenty-one percent estimate that they spend one hour or more during a typical workday searching the Internet for non-work-related information, photos, etc.

Behaviors of co-workers, meetings and other factors are also creating obstacles to maximizing performance. When asked what they consider to be the primary productivity stoppers in the workplace, employers pointed to:

1) Cell phone/texting – 50 percent

2) Gossip – 42 percent

3) The Internet – 39 percent

4) Social media – 38 percent

5) Snack breaks or smoke breaks – 27 percent

6) Noisy co-workers – 24 percent

7) Meetings – 23 percent

8) Email – 23 percent

9) Co-workers dropping by – 23 percent

10) Co-workers putting calls on speaker phone – 10 percent

Employers also shared real-life examples of some of the more unusual things they’ve seen employees doing when they should have been busy working:

· Employee was blowing bubbles in sub-zero weather to see if the bubbles would freeze and break

· A married employee was looking at a dating web site and then denied it while it was still up on his computer screen

· Employee was caring for her pet bird that she smuggled into work

· Employee was shaving her legs in the women’s restroom

· Employee was laying under boxes to scare people

· Employees were having a wrestling match

· Employee was sleeping, but claimed he was praying

· Employee was taking selfies in the bathroom

· Employee was changing clothes in a cubicle

· Employee was printing off a book from the Internet

· Employee was warming her bare feet under the bathroom hand dryer

“While many managers feel their teams perform at a desirable level, they also warn that little distractions can add up to bigger gaps in productivity,” said Rosemary Haefner, Vice President of Human Resources at CareerBuilder. “It’s important to be organized and designate times to work on different deliverables. Minimize interruptions and save personal communications for your lunch hour or break. It can help put more time and momentum back into your workday.”

Nearly three in four employers (73 percent) have implemented some measures to mitigate productivity killers at work. Tactics include:

· Blocking certain Internet sites at work – 36 percent

· Prohibiting personal calls or personal use of cell phones – 25 percent

· Monitoring emails and Internet usage – 22 percent

· Scheduling lunch and break times – 19 percent

· Allowing people to telecommute – 14 percent

· Implementing an open space layout instead of cubicles – 13 percent

· Limiting meetings – 12 percent

· Restricting use of speaker phones if not in an office – 11 percent

Haefner offers the following tips to avoid wasting time on the job:

1) Organize and prioritize – De-clutter your workspace and clearly lay out your game plan for the week. What do you need to accomplish each day? How much time will each project take? Which projects have the highest priority?

2) Limit interruptions – Incoming calls and co-workers dropping by to chat about their weekend can break your concentration and eat up time. Block off a conference room to work on a project to avoid distractions at your desk. Read your email at intervals instead of opening each one as soon as it comes in. Consider telecommuting on certain days.

3) Avoid unnecessary meetings – Don’t set aside an hour to meet about an issue or initiative that can be addressed with a quick phone call. Politely decline the meeting invitation and follow up with the organizer.

4) Get personal on your own time – Whether you want to call a friend, take advantage of an online sale or post a picture of your dog on your social profile, do it during your lunch hour or break time or after work.

5) Communicate wisely – Don’t spend 20 minutes crafting an email to the person sitting in the next cubicle. Save time by picking up the phone or walking over to your colleague’s desk.

6) Don’t delay the inevitable – Finding other things to do so you can put off a less preferred project will only end up wasting more time. Don’t procrastinate. Dive in and tackle the task at hand.

Survey Methodology

This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Poll on behalf of CareerBuilder among 2,138 hiring managers and human resource professionals and 3,022 workers (employed full-time, not self-employed, non-government) ages 18 and over between February 10 and March 4, 2014 (percentages for some questions are based on a subset, based on their responses to certain questions). With pure probability samples of 2,138 and 3,022, one could say with a 95 percent probability that the overall results have sampling errors of +/-2.12 and +/-1.78 percentage points, respectively. Sampling error for data from sub-samples is higher and varies.

About CareerBuilder®

CareerBuilder is the global leader in human capital solutions, helping companies target and attract great talent. Its online career site, CareerBuilder.com®, is the largest in the United States with more than 24 million unique visitors and 1 million jobs. CareerBuilder works with the world’s top employers, providing everything from labor market intelligence to talent management software and other recruitment solutions. Owned by Gannett Co., Inc. (NYSE:GCI), Tribune Company and The McClatchy Company (NYSE:MNI), CareerBuilder and its subsidiaries operate in the United States, Europe, South America, Canada and Asia. For more information, visit http://www.careerbuilder.com.